Robert Fowler (December 14, 2016)

Robert Fowler (December 14, 2016)

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Rob Fowler is Director of High Performance Computing at the Renaissance Computing Institute, part of UNC, in Chapel Hill. While at RENCI he has held adjunct professorships in Computer Science at UNC, Duke, and Rice. Prior to UNC he was at the Center for High Performance Software Research at Rice University. He also held positions at the University of Washington, University of Rochester, and the University of Copenhagen. His education includes an A.B. in Physics from Harvard (1971) and M.S. (1981) and Ph.D. (1985) degrees from the University of Washington. His research interests span the area of high performance distributed and parallel computing. Specific interests include compilers and programming environments, architectures, operating systems, performance evaluation, and simulation.

He presented an ISTI seminar during his visit.

Laura McNamara (November 30, 2016)

Laura McNamara (November 30, 2016)

Sandia National Laboratories

Laura McNamara has spent the past 18 years in the Department of Energy’s national laboratory system as an anthropologist working in contextual design and evaluation for national security technology systems. She wrote her dissertation about knowledge loss in the post-Cold War nuclear weapons programs at Los Alamos, then spent a couple of happy years as a staff member at LANL’s Statistical Sciences group before accepting a position at Sandia National Laboratories in 2003. These days, most of her work deals with the design and evaluation of human-information interaction systems across a wide range of domains, from cybersecurity forensics to synthetic aperture radar (SAR) operational interfaces. At Sandia, she gets to work in a wide range of technical areas, from software design and evaluation, visual cognition and human-information interaction; mostly within Sandia’s Airborne Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (ISR) research community. She holds a Ph.D. in Anthropology from the University of New Mexico.

She presented an ISTI seminar during her visit.

Claire Guildaud (November 6, 2016)

Claire Guildaud (November 6, 2016)

CEA/DAM-Ile de France

After a PhD in computer graphics, Claire Guilbaud has been working for CEA for 13 years as researcher-engineer. First, she developed a software to extract and process time data from large simulations. Since 5 years, she is the lead developer of the visualization software Love.

She presented an ISTI seminar during her visit.

Matt Larsen (September 7, 2016)

Matt Larsen (September 7, 2016)

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Matt Larsen is a Ph.D. Candidate in Computer Science at the University of Oregon. He also holds a full-time staff computer scientist position at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Matt started the Ph.D. program in September 2013, and began his concurrent role at LLNL in January 2016. His research interests include computer graphics, GPU computing, portable performance, and scientific visualization. At LLNL, Matt’s is a member of the VisIt development team and his projects focus on in situ visualization research, volume rendering, and simulated radiography.

He presented an ISTI seminar during his visit.

Pat Crossno (August 31, 2016)

Pat Crossno (August 31, 2016)

Sandia National Laboratories

Patricia Crossno is a Principal Member of Technical Staff in the Scalable Analysis and Visualization group at Sandia National Laboratories. Her research interests include visual representations for abstract data, time series analysis and visualization, visualizing ensembles of simulations, and model comparison and evaluation.

She presented an ISTI seminar during her visit.

Kenny Gruchalla (July 20, 2016)

Kenny Gruchalla (July 20, 2016)

National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Kenny Gruchalla is a senior scientist at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and an adjunct assistant professor at the University of Colorado at Boulder. He leads the scientific visualization
efforts in the Computational Science Center at NREL. Kenny has more than 20 years of applied professional experience in scientific programming and scientific visualization, spanning several scientific disciplines, including: energy, aerospace, geophysics, molecular biology, and environmental engineering. His work has primarily focused on developing interactive scientific visualization techniques that provide tools for finding meaning in increasingly large and complex data. He holds a Ph.D. and M.S. in computer science from the University of Colorado at Boulder and a B.S. in computer science from New Mexico Tech.

He presented an ISTI seminar during his visit.

Klaus Mueller (July 13, 2016)

Klaus Mueller (July 13, 2016)

Stony Brook University

Klaus Mueller received a Ph.D. in computer science from the Ohio State University. He is currently a professor in the Computer Science Department at Stony Brook University and is also an
adjunct scientist in the Computational Science Initiative at Brookhaven National Labs. His current research interests are visualization, visual analytics, data science, medical imaging, and high performance computing, He won the US National Science Foundation CAREER award in 2001 and the SUNY Chancellor Award in 2011. Mueller has authored more than 170 peer-reviewed journal and conference papers, which have been cited more than 6,500 times. He is a frequent speaker at international conferences, has participated in numerous tutorials on various topics, and was until recently the chair of the IEEE Technical Committee on Visualization and Computer Graphics. He is also back on the editorial board of IEEE Transactions on Visualization and Computer Graphics and he is a senior member of the IEEE.

He presented an ISTI seminar during his visit.

Greg Abram (June 13 - mid-August, 2016)

Greg Abram (June 13 - mid-August, 2016)

Texas Advanced Computing Center

Greg Abram is a visualization researcher at the Texas Advanced Computing Center, a research division of the University of Texas at Austin. Prior to joining TACC, he was at the IBM TJ Watson Research Center. He received his Ph.D. from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 1986.
Terry Turton (June 13 to mid-August, 2016)

Terry Turton (June 13 to mid-August, 2016)

University of Texas - Austin

Terry Turton will be visiting intermittently from mid-June to mid-August. Terry is an Associate Research Scientist at the University of Texas – Austin’s Center for Agile Technology. She received her Ph.D. in Physics from the University of Michigan and did postdoctoral work at the Superconducting Super Collider, Michgan State University and the University of Cincinnati. Her current work focuses on improved colormaps for scientific visualization and creating, implementing, running and analyzing user studies to improve visualizations of scientific data.
Hans Hagen (March 21 & 22, 2016)

Hans Hagen (March 21 & 22, 2016)

Technical University of Kaiserslautern

Hans Hagen is a full professor at the Technical University of Kaiserslautern and an adjunct professor at the University of California/Davis. He is also the scientific director of the institute on Intelligent Visualization and Simulation at the German Research Center for Artificial Intelligence (DFKI). He holds a Ph.D. in mathematics from the University of Dortmund, a B. S. and M. S. in mathematics and a B. S. in computer science from the University of Freiburg. Prior to his curent position, he was an associate professor at the TU Braunschweig and he had several visiting positions, especially in the USA. His research interests include all areas of scientific visualization, computer graphics and geometric modeling. He was editor in chief of the IEEE Transactions on visualization and computer graphics from 1999-2003 and is an associated editor of CAGD, Computing and Surveys on Mathematics in Industry. Prof. Hagen has published nearly 200 articles in scientific visualization, computer graphics, geometric modelling and geometry and is a member of ACM, GI, IEEE, and SIAM.
Stephen Hamilton (March 7-11, 2016)

Stephen Hamilton (March 7-11, 2016)

Johns Hopkins University

Stephen Hamilton is a Computer Science Ph.D. student at the Johns Hopkins University with Professor Randal Burns and a Major in the US Army. He will join Professor Burns during part of his fall 2015 to spring 2016 stay at Los Alamos. During his visit Stephen will continue his research on ParaView and Turbulence.
Hans Hagen (March 7, 2016)

Hans Hagen (March 7, 2016)

Technical University of Kaiserslautern

Hans Hagen is a full professor at the Technical University of Kaiserslautern and an adjunct professor at the University of California/Davis. He is also the scientific director of the institute on Intelligent Visualization and Simulation at the German Research Center for Artificial Intelligence (DFKI). He holds a Ph.D. in mathematics from the University of Dortmund, a B. S. and M. S. in mathematics and a B. S. in computer science from the University of Freiburg. Prior to his curent position, he was an associate professor at the TU Braunschweig and he had several visiting positions, especially in the USA. His research interests include all areas of scientific visualization, computer graphics and geometric modeling. He was editor in chief of the IEEE Transactions on visualization and computer graphics from 1999-2003 and is an associated editor of CAGD, Computing and Surveys on Mathematics in Industry. Prof. Hagen has published nearly 200 articles in scientific visualization, computer graphics, geometric modelling and geometry and is a member of ACM, GI, IEEE, and SIAM.
Ariane Middel (March 7, 2016)

Ariane Middel (March 7, 2016)

Arizona State University

Ariane Middel’s primary research interests are directed toward understanding the dynamics of urban climate to develop climate adaptation and heat mitigation strategies, specifically addressing the challenges of sustainable urban form, design, and landscapes in the face of climatic uncertainty in rapidly urbanizing regions. For the past five years, she has advanced the field of urban climatology through applied and solutions-oriented research employing urban, local, and microscale climate modeling and monitoring to investigate sustainability challenges related to Urban Heat Islands, thermal comfort, water use and quality, energy use, and human-climate interactions in cities. Dr. Middel is currently an Assistant Research Professor in the School of Geographical Sciences and Urban Planning. She received her Ph.D. in Computer Science (visualization) from University of Kaiserslautern, Germany and holds a M.Sc./B.Sc. in Geodetic Engineering from the University of Bonn, Germany.

She presented an ISTI seminar during her visit.

Ross Maciejewski (March 7, 2016)

Ross Maciejewski (March 7, 2016)

Arizona State University

Ross Maciejewski (PhD, Purdue University) is an Assistant Professor in the School of Computing, Informatics and Decision Systems Engineering at Arizona State University. Prior to joining Arizona State University Dr. Maciejewski served as a visiting faculty member at Purdue as a member of the Department of Homeland Security’s Center of Excellence focusing on visual analytics (VACCINE). His work at Purdue’s VACCINE Center was honored by the United States Coast Guard with a Meritorious Team Commendation as part of his work on the Port Resilience for Operational Tactical Enforcement to Combat Terrorism (PROTECT) Team. Dr. Maciejewski’s recent work has actively explored the extraction and linking of disparate data sources exploring combinations of structured geographic data to unstructured social media data to enhance situational awareness. His primary research interests are in the areas of geographical visualization and visual analytics focusing on public health, dietary analysis, social media, and criminal incident reports. He has served on the organizing committee for the IEEE Conference on Visual Analytics Science and Technology (2012-2013, 2015) and the IEEE/VGTC EuroVis Conference (2014-2016) and has been involved in award winning submissions to the IEEE Visual Analytics Contest (2010, 2013 and 2015). He is a Fellow of the Global Security Initiative at ASU and the recipient of an NSF CAREER Award (2014). For more information on his current work visit vader.lab.asu.edu.

He presented an ISTI seminar during his visit.

Hans Hagen (January 26 & 27, 2016)

Hans Hagen (January 26 & 27, 2016)

Technical University of Kaiserslautern

Hans Hagen is a full professor at the Technical University of Kaiserslautern and an adjunct professor at the University of California/Davis. He is also the scientific director of the institute on Intelligent Visualization and Simulation at the German Research Center for Artificial Intelligence (DFKI). He holds a Ph.D. in mathematics from the University of Dortmund, a B. S. and M. S. in mathematics and a B. S. in computer science from the University of Freiburg. Prior to his curent position, he was an associate professor at the TU Braunschweig and he had several visiting positions, especially in the USA. His research interests include all areas of scientific visualization, computer graphics and geometric modeling. He was editor in chief of the IEEE Transactions on visualization and computer graphics from 1999-2003 and is an associated editor of CAGD, Computing and Surveys on Mathematics in Industry. Prof. Hagen has published nearly 200 articles in scientific visualization, computer graphics, geometric modelling and geometry and is a member of ACM, GI, IEEE, and SIAM.
Vladimir Braverman (January 21, 2016)

Vladimir Braverman (January 21, 2016)

Johns Hopkins University

Vladimir Braverman is an Assistant Professor with the Department of Computer
Science at the Johns Hopkins University. His main research interests are
randomized and streaming algorithms. Vladimir obtained his B.Sc. and M.Sc.
degrees from Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Israel, and his Ph.D. from
UCLA in 2011. Prior to attending UCLA, Braverman has led a research team at
HyperRoll, a startup company that has been acquired by Oracle in 2009.

He presented an ISTI seminar during his visit.

Roxana Bujack (January to March, 2016)

Roxana Bujack (January to March, 2016)

The University of California - Davis

Roxana Bujack graduated in mathematics and computer science and received her Ph.D. in the Image and Signal Processing group at Leipzig University in Germany. Currently, she is a Postdoctoral Researcher at the Institute for Data Analysis and Visualization (IDAV) at the University of California, Davis with Prof. Kenneth I. Joy. Her research interests include flow visualization, pattern recognition in vector fields, moment invariants, and Clifford analysis.

She presented an ISTI seminar during her visit.

Bill Hoffman (December 8, 2015)

Bill Hoffman (December 8, 2015)

Kitware

Bill Hoffman is a founder of Kitware and currently serves as Vice President and Chief Technical Officer. He is the original author and lead architect of CMake , an open-source, cross-platform build and configuration tool that is used by hundreds of projects around the world and the co-author of the accompanying text, Mastering CMake. Using his 20+ years of experience with large software systems development, Mr. Hoffman is also a major technical contributor to Kitware’s Visualization Toolkit, Insight Toolkit and ParaView projects.
Jasper van de Gronde (December 7 to 11, 2015)

Jasper van de Gronde (December 7 to 11, 2015)

The University of Groningen

Jasper van de Gronde is a postdoc in the Scientific Visualization and Computer Graphics research group at the University of Groningen in The Netherlands. He is interested in all sorts of signal/image processing topics, including compressed sensing, linear and morphological filters, and deep learning, with a special interest in applications on large/high-dimensional and non-scalar data. His Ph.D. thesis was on morphological operators for tensor images, exploring shape and structure in movement and direction dependence.

He presented an ISTI seminar during his visit.

Alex Baden (December 9 to 11, 2015)

Alex Baden (December 9 to 11, 2015)

Johns Hopkins University

Alex Baden is a Computer Science Ph.D. student at the Johns Hopkins University with Professor Randal Burns. He will join Professor Burns during part of his fall 2015 to spring 2016 stay at Los Alamos. During his visit Alex will continue his research on 3-D Web-services in JavaScript libraries with Randal. He will also collaborate with the Data Science at Scale team on virtualized environments.
Diana Fernandez (October 19 to 23, 2015)

Diana Fernandez (October 19 to 23, 2015)

The University of Kaiserslautern

Diana Fernandez is a Ph.D. student in Computer Science at the University of Kaiserslautern in Germany. Her research is in the visualization of spatio-temporal data sets, scientific visualization and information visualization.
Christoph Garth (October 9, 2015)

Christoph Garth (October 9, 2015)

The University of Kaiserslautern

Christoph Garth is an assistant professor at the Technical University of Kaiserslautern in the Computational Topology Group of the Department of Computer Science. He has published nearly 50 articles since 2004 in visualization computational topology, visual analysis, flow visualization, fluid flow and high-performance visualization.
Jim Jeffers (September 15, 2015)

Jim Jeffers (September 15, 2015)

Intel

Jim Jeffers is a Prinicipal Engineer at Intel where he works with Intel teams, HPC / Supercomputing customers and industry to enable effective use of Intel(r) parallel computing hardware and software solutions including Intel(r) Xeon(r) processors, Intel(r) Xeon Phi(tm) products and Intel(r) True Scale Fabric products. He is leading the development of high performance and high fidelity technical computing visualization solutions including the Open Source Embree Ray Tracing Library and Toolkit.
Bruce Cherniak (September 15, 2015)

Bruce Cherniak (September 15, 2015)

Intel

Bruce Cherniak is a Senior Graphics Software Engineer in Intel’s Enterprise and HPC Platform Group. Bruce joined Intel in 2006 to work on an exciting new many-core parallel processor focused on the dawning epoch of software graphics. Bruce’s passion and experience includes software development and technical leadership in all levels of the graphics pipeline, and graphics software developer relations. He has worked on systems ranging from embedded controllers to high-end professional graphics solutions. Bruce is currently a developer and evangelist for Intel’s parallel software based renderer – OpenSWR.
Randal Burns (September 2015 to May 2016)

Randal Burns (September 2015 to May 2016)

Johns Hopkins University

Randal Burns is an Associate Professor in the Department of Computer Science and the Institute for Data-Intensive Engineering and Science at the Johns Hopkins University. He is a co-founder, chief architect, and the lead developer of the Open Connectome Project. His research for the last decade has centered on high-performance computing for scientific applications, specifically spatial data organization, batch query processing, and parallel data architectures. He has only recently discovered that neuroscience has the coolest data; he is a first time NIH Principal Investigator as of 2012. He is also a member of the Defense Science Study Group (DSSG) Class of 2012-2013.
Satoshi Matsuoka (August 26, 2015)

Satoshi Matsuoka (August 26, 2015)

Tokyo Institute of Technology

Satoshi Matsuoka received his Ph. D. from the University of Tokyo in 1993. He became a full Professor at the Global Scientific Information and Computing Center (GSIC) of Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech / Titech) in April 2001, leading the Research Infrastructure Division Solving Environment Group of the Titech campus. He has pioneered grid computing research in Japan the mid 90s along with his collaborators, and currently serves as sub-leader of the Japanese National Research Grid Initiative (NAREGI) project, that aim to create middleware for next-generation CyberScience Infrastructure. He was also the technical leader in the construction of the TSUBAME supercomputer, which has become the fast supercomputer in Asia-Pacific in June, 2006 at 85 Teraflops (peak, now 111 Teraflops as of March 2009) and 38.18 Teraflops (Linpack, 7th on the June 2006 list) and also serves as the core grid resource in the Titech Campus Grid. He has been (co-) program and general chairs of several international conferences including ACM OOPSLA’2002, IEEE CCGrid 2003, HPCAsia 2004, Grid 2006, CCGrid 2006/2007/2008, as well as countless program committee positions, in particular numerous ACM/IEEE Supercomputing Conference (SC) technical papers committee duties including serving as the network area chair for SC2004, SC2008, and was the technical papers chair for SC2009, and will be the Communities Program Chair for SC2011. He served as a Steering Group member and an Area Director of the Global Grid Forum during 1999-2005, and recently became the steering group member of the Supercomputing Conference. He has won several awards including the Sakai award for research excellence from the Information Processing Society of Japan in 1999, and recently received the JSPS Prize from the Japan Society for Promotion of Science in 2006 from his Royal Highness Prince Akishinomiya.

He presented an ISTI seminar during his visit.

Dave DeMarle (August 17 to 21, 2015)

Dave DeMarle (August 17 to 21, 2015)

Kitware

Dave DeMarle received his B.S. in Electrical and Computer Engineering from the SUNY University at Buffalo in 1995, and his M.S. in Computer Science from the University of Utah in 2003. In the interim Dave worked as a computer systems engineer for the Link Flight Simulation Division of the L3-Communications Corporation. Dave’s research interests are in systems level aspects of visualization, in particular memory optimizations for parallel visualization of large data sets. Mr. DeMarle joined Kitware in June of 2005 where he contributes to both ParaView and VTK. He frequently teaches Kitware’s professional development and training courses for these product applications.
Bernd Hamann (August 17 to 18, 2015)

Bernd Hamann (August 17 to 18, 2015)

The University of California - Davis

Bernd Hamann studied mathematics and computer science at the Technical University of Braunschweig, Germany, and Arizona State University. At the University of California, Davis, he teaches computer science courses, with a focus on visualization, geometric design and modeling, and computer graphics. Jointly with his students, post-doctoral scholars and other collaborators he has contributed to the development of techniques for the analysis and visual exploration of complex, large scientific data.
Torsten Moeller (August 17, 2015)

Torsten Moeller (August 17, 2015)

The University of Vienna

Torsten Moeller is a professor at the University of Vienna, Austria, since 2013. Between 1999 and 2012 he served as a Computing Science faculty member at Simon Fraser University, Canada. He received his Ph.D. in Computer and Information Science from Ohio State University in 1999 and a Vordiplom (BSc) in mathematical computer science from Humboldt University of Berlin, Germany. He is a senior member of IEEE and ACM, and a member of Eurographics. His research interests include algorithms and tools for analyzing and displaying data with principles rooted in computer graphics, image processing, visualization and human-computer interaction. He heads the research group of Visualization and Data Analysis. He served as the appointed Vice Chair for Publications of the IEEE Visualization and Graphics Technical Committee (VGTC) between 2003 and 2012. He has served on a number of program committees and has been papers co-chair for IEEE Visualization, EuroVis, Graphics Interface, and the Workshop on Volume Graphics as well as the Visualization track of the 2007 International Symposium on Visual Computing. He has also co-organized the 2004 Workshop on Mathematical Foundations of Scientific Visualization, Computer Graphics, and Massive Data Exploration as well as the 2010 Workshop on Sampling and Reconstruction: Applications and Advances at the Banff International Research Station, Canada. He is a co-founding chair of the Symposium on Biological Data Visualization (BioVis). In 2010, he was the recipient of the NSERC DAS award. He received best paper awards from IEEE Conference on Visualization (1997), Symposium on Geometry Processing (2008), and EuroVis (2010), as well as two second best paper awards from EuroVis (2009, 2012).

He presented an ISTI seminar during his visit.

Bill Howe (August 12, 2015)

Bill Howe (August 12, 2015)

The University of Washington

Bill Howe is the Associate Director of the UW eScience Institute and holds an Affiliate Assistant Professor appointment in Computer Science & Engineering at the University of Washington, where he studies data management, analytics, and visualization systems for science applications. Howe has received two Jim Gray Seed Grant awards from Microsoft Research for work on managing environmental data, has had two papers elected to VLDB Journal’s ‘Best of Conference’ issues (2004 and 2010), and co-authored what are currently the most-cited papers from both VLDB 2010 and SIGMOD 2012. Howe serves on the program and organizing committees for a number of conferences in the area of databases and scientific data management, and serves on the Science Advisory Board of the SciDB project. He has a Ph.D. in Computer Science from Portland State University and a Bachelor’s degree in Industrial & Systems Engineering from Georgia Tech.

He presented an ISTI seminar during his visit.

Dan Keefe (August 5, 2015)

Dan Keefe (August 5, 2015)

The University of Minnesota

Dan Keefe is an Associate Professor in the Department of Computer Science and Engineering at the University of Minnesota. His research centers on scientific data visualization and interactive computer graphics. Keefe’s recent awards include the National Science Foundation CAREER award; the University of Minnesota Guillermo E. Borja Award for research and scholarly accomplishments; the University of Minnesota McKnight Land-Grant Professorship; and the 3M Non-tenured Faculty Award. He has received multiple best paper and best panel awards at top international conferences, such as IEEE VIS and ACM Interactive 3D Graphics. His research has been funded by the National Science Foundation, the National Institutes of Health, the National Academies Keck Futures Initiative, and industry sponsors. In addition to his work in computer science, Keefe is also an accomplished artist and has published and exhibited work in top international venues for digital art. Before joining the University of Minnesota, Keefe did post-doctoral work at Brown University jointly with the departments of Computer Science and Ecology and Evolutionary Biology and with the Rhode Island School of Design. He received the Ph.D. in 2007 from Brown University’s Department of Computer Science and the B.S. in Computer Engineering summa cum laude from Tufts University in 1999.

He presented an ISTI seminar during his visit.

Gagan Agrawal (July 29, 2015)

Gagan Agrawal (July 29, 2015)

The Ohio State University

Gagan Agrawal is an educator and researcher in Computer Science and Engineering, currently a professor at the Ohio State University. He has published more than 170 papers in his 19 year research career. He has graduated 12 Ph.Ds (currently working with another 11 Ph.D students) and his research has been supported by more than 7 million dollars of funding from government agencies. Gagan has conducted research in a number of computer science areas, including parallel and distributed systems and applications, data-intensive computing, compilers, middleware systems, data mining, data integration, web search, and web/grid services. His current research focuses on a number of topics, including issues in programming emerging multi-core machines and GPGPUs, deep web search, time-critical/adaptive systems, and data-intensive computing. He has taught graduate and undergraduate classes in operating systems, distributed systems, computer architecture, and compilers. In addition to his research and teaching responsibilities at Ohio State, Gagan has served as the graduate program chair for his department at Ohio State since 2003.

He presented an ISTI seminar during his visit.

Wu-Chun Feng (July 22, 2015)

Wu-Chun Feng (July 22, 2015)

Virginia Tech

Wu-Chun (Wu) Feng is the Elizabeth & James E. Turner Fellow & Professor in the Department of Computer Science, Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering, and Virginia Bioinformatics Institute at Virginia Tech. His interests lie broadly at the synergistic intersection of computer architecture, systems software and middleware, and applications software. Most recently, his research has dealt with high-performance networking protocols, dynamic multicore scheduling, accelerator-based computing for bioinformatics, virtual computing, power-aware computing, and bioinformatics in general. He joined Virginia Tech in 2006 after spending seven years at Los Alamos National Laboratory. He is the recipient of three Best Paper Awards in human-computer interaction, high-performance networking, and bioinformatics, respectively, and three R&D 100 Awards in green supercomputing, high-speed networking, and bioinformatics, respectively. He leads the SyNeRGy Laboratory as well as four grass roots projects: The Green500 List, mpiBLAST, Supercomputing in Small Spaces, and MyVICE.

He presented an ISTI seminar during his visit.

Hans Hagen (July 15, 2016)

Hans Hagen (July 15, 2016)

Technical University of Kaiserslautern

Hans Hagen is a full professor at the Technical University of Kaiserslautern and an adjunct professor at the University of California/Davis. He is also the scientific director of the institute on Intelligent Visualization and Simulation at the German Research Center for Artificial Intelligence (DFKI). He holds a Ph.D. in mathematics from the University of Dortmund, a B. S. and M. S. in mathematics and a B. S. in computer science from the University of Freiburg. Prior to his curent position, he was an associate professor at the TU Braunschweig and he had several visiting positions, especially in the USA. His research interests include all areas of scientific visualization, computer graphics and geometric modeling. He was editor in chief of the IEEE Transactions on visualization and computer graphics from 1999-2003 and is an associated editor of CAGD, Computing and Surveys on Mathematics in Industry. Prof. Hagen has published nearly 200 articles in scientific visualization, computer graphics, geometric modelling and geometry and is a member of ACM, GI, IEEE, and SIAM.
Kenneth Moreland

Kenneth Moreland

Sandia National Laboratories

Dr. Kenneth Moreland is a principal member of technical staff at Sandia National Laboratories. He received the BS degrees in computer science and in electrical engineering from the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology in 1997. He received the MS and Ph.D. degrees in computer science from the University of New Mexico in 2000, and 2004, respectively. Dr. Moreland specializes in large-scale visualization and graphics and has played an active role in the development of several HPC products including ParaView, VTK, IceT, and Dax. His current interests the design and development of visualization algorithms and systems to run on multi-core, many-core and future-generation computer hardware.

He presented an ISTI seminar during his visit.

Cindy Rubio Gonzalez (June 24, 2015)

Cindy Rubio Gonzalez (June 24, 2015)

The University of California - Davis

Cindy Rubio Gonzalez is an Assistant Professor of Computer Science at the University of California, Davis. Prior to that position, she was a Postdoctoral Researcher in the Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences Department at the University of California, Berkeley, where she worked with Koushik Sen, James Demmel, Costin Iancu, and William Kahan. She received her Ph.D. in Computer Science from the University of Wisconsin–Madison in 2012, advised by Prof. Ben Liblit. Her work spans the areas of programming languages and software engineering, with a specific focus on program analysis. Her research aims to design and build tools to help developers write more reliable and efficient software. For her doctoral dissertation, she designed and applied static program analyses to find error-propagation bugs in large software systems. At UC Berkeley, Cindy led the development of dynamic program analysis tools to improve the performance of numerical programs. Cindy is a UC Davis CAMPOS Faculty Scholar, an AAUW International Doctoral Fellow, and a member of Latinas in Computing. Cindy earned her M.S. in Computer Science from the University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee and her B.S. in Computer Engineering from Saltillo Institute of Technology (Mexico). She also received a B.M. in Piano Performance from the Autonomous University of Coahuila (Mexico). Cindy is originally from Saltillo, Coahuila, México.

She presented an ISTI seminar during her visit.

Cecilia Aragon (June 17, 2015)

Cecilia Aragon (June 17, 2015)

The University of Washington

Dr. Cecilia Aragon is the director of the Human-Centered Data Science Lab at the University of Washington. Her research focuses on human-centered data science, which concerns itself with both the algorithms and the highly interwoven and multifaceted interactions among individuals, society, and technology that are catalyzed by the enormous growth in data that characterizes the current age. Aragon’s research group develops software to facilitate insight into vast and complex data sets, incorporating techniques such as visual analytics (visualization and machine learning), data science, ethnography, and the study of sociotechnical systems including informal text communication and social media. Other projects include the use of computer gaming for collaborative science learning, and topics related to usability and sustainability. She was the architect for Sunfall, a collaborative visual analytics system for supernova astrophysics. She developed an augmented-reality visualization system for helicopter pilots that increased their ability to land safely during simulated hazardous conditions. Her early work was in theoretical computer science. She was the co-inventor (with Raimund Seidel) of the treap, a binary search tree in which each node has both a key and a priority, and the randomized search tree, which uses random priorities in treaps to achieve good average-case performance. With Johnson, McGeoch, and Schevon, she conducted the first extensive evaluation of the simulated annealing algorithm in combinatorial optimization problems.

She presented an ISTI seminar during her visit.

Greg Abram (Mid-June to August, 2015)

Greg Abram (Mid-June to August, 2015)

Texas Advanced Computing Center

Greg Abram is a visualization researcher at the Texas Advanced Computing Center, a research division of the University of Texas at Austin. Prior to joining TACC, he was at the IBM TJ Watson Research Center. He received his Ph.D. from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 1986.
Terry Turton (Mid-June to August, 2015)

Terry Turton (Mid-June to August, 2015)

University of Texas - Austin

Terry Turton will be visiting intermittently from mid-June to mid-August. Terry is an Associate Research Scientist at the University of Texas – Austin’s Center for Agile Technology. She received her Ph.D. in Physics from the University of Michigan and did postdoctoral work at the Superconducting Super Collider, Michgan State University and the University of Cincinnati. Her current work focuses on improved colormaps for scientific visualization and creating, implementing, running and analyzing user studies to improve visualizations of scientific data.

She presented an ISTI seminar during her visit.

Jake Johnson (February 17, 2015)

Jake Johnson (February 17, 2015)

Nebula

Jake Johnson is a Sales Engineer at Nebula. He was previously a Storage Technology Strategist at Ocarina Networks / Dell. Prior to that he was a Sales Engineer at Storewiz, IBRIX and Andataco. He will be onsite to oversee installation of a Nebula OpenStack Cloud Cluster to be called Galton. He will also present a tutorial on its use.
Hamish Carr (February 2 to March 13, 2015)

Hamish Carr (February 2 to March 13, 2015)

The University of Leeds

Hamish Carr is currently a member of the Visualization and Virtual Reality Group at the University of Leeds where he also teaches Software Engineering. He has taught I have taught Computer Graphics, Advanced Computer Graphics and Scientific & Medical Visualization. Carr’s interests are in anything that combines geometry, computers and a visual element. This includes computer graphics, computational geometry, scientific and medical visualization, and graph theory.

He presented an ISTI seminar during his visit.